Vivisection is fraud; “biomedical research” is sadism masked as “science”; and animal experimentation yields but a surrealist collage of meaningless data to pimp for the true numbers measured in profit and durrencies that float Big Pharma and the global vivisection-industrial complex far above the regulative power of the state and the norms of accountability.

Bullfighting involves a gang of puerile cowards in pink and purple tights playing at being “men.”

Hunters are dickless eunuchs who compensate for cruel shortcomings of nature and a deep inferiority complex by killing innocent animals in a perverse spectacle and rigged game dignified as a “sport.”

And now, for the last two decades or so, an increasing number of intellectually impoverished and morally bereft troglodytes are joining the worst protoplasmic scum of humanity in sordid kinship, in a profane bond of base bloodletting disguised as metaphysics, deep thinking, and spiritual depth.

Assholes posing as artists seek to transcend their inner vacuity through exercising the pathetic human will to power over animals and sublimating their bloodlust into rarified concepts with alleged enlightening effect. For these narcissistic lunatics think that clichéd concepts +  acts of torturing and killing animals = profound “art.”

They pretend that the heinous evil of their demented acts is either non-existent (the aesthetic trumps the moral) or is inapplicable to them as artists. These “higher types” arrogate to themselves the authority for a “teleological suspension of the ethical” (Kierkegaard); bound by rules but their own, these mavericks must sail “beyond good and evil” (Nietzsche), as do, but instead of blazing toward endless horizons and blue seas they run aground on sandbars of bodies rising out of  a cove of blood. “Animal artists” — these pompous posers, these putrid specimens of feculent humanity — are as insecure, weak, power-hungry, misguided, demented, and fraudulent as their bastard brethren weilding scalpels, swords, and guns.

It is time to call this “work” what it is – utter shit and pernicious crap that reeks of arrogance and ignorance.  “Ars Animalis” is the antithesis of anything remotely related to the beautiful rather than the ugly, to the sublime rather than to the sewer.

Apparently, this outrageous stunt below is real; as a sheep’s life might depend on the outcome of a democratic vote, here is one ballot you might want to sign. In my view, the “artists” should be locked into the guillotine and the sheep allowed to ram it until the blade drops on their fat jowels and pernicious heads which wouldl look more appealing in a crimson-colored basket than on their repellent Homo rapiens bodies.

Wait, sorry, that is not democratic, and thus vulgar, barbarian, and uncivilized. So, after voting for the sheep, let’s have a popular assembly and forum on whether the “artists” — Iman Rezai and Rouven Materne — should be allowed to live …. or … (the guillitine is too easy, too weak in impact and dramatic effect) be pushed from the tallest building in the world onto a street-sized canvas, to make the most beautiful painting ever beheld by human eyes.

SB

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Thursday, April 26, 2012

13.7 Billion Years

Ars Animalis | Die Guillotine

German artists will behead a sheep with a guillotine, unless you say no. You have 21 days left to vote.
[Animals were there at the beginning of art. But how did we get from Chauvet to “Dogs Playing Poker” and beyond? That’s one of the questions 13.7 will be asking with this month’s series, “Ars Animalis“—art of the animals.] Two students from the Berlin University of the Arts are crowdsourcing the conclusion of a performance piece entitled Die Guillotine (The Guillotine) that features said guillotine and (at least for now) a live sheep.

On their website, the artists, Iman Rezai and Rouven Materne, ask visitors a single question: “Soll dieses Schaf getötet werden?” (“Should this sheep be killed?”)

“The guillotine is the most compact reflection of our society,” says Materne in the German-only video, adding that the intentionally provocative work is a “criticism of current morality.”

As of this writing, the online poll has 147,473 respondents answering yes and 289,0463 voting no. Voters have the next 21 days to decide the fate of the helpless sheep.

Animal cruelty in art and culture is not new. One could point to a wide array of cultural events connected to the torture of animals. Bullfighting comes to mind, or any of a number of culture-specific rituals throughout history involving the death of animals, even human sacrifice.

More recently, at the Trapholt Art Museum in Kolding, Denmark, in 2003, the artist Marco Evaristti put live goldfish in blenders, inviting visitors to press the “on” button to kill the fish.

This theme, in fact, was an early one on 13.7 Billion Years. On March 14, 2008, just a few days after this blog was launched, the post was about the artist Guillermo Vargas Habacuc, who supposedly captured an abandoned street dog, tied him up in an art gallery and left him there to die of hunger and thirst while visitors watched his slow death.

Is this art?
Should live animals be used in art?
Does Die Guillotine make a point? If so, what is it?
Will the fate of the sheep say something about society?

Add your comments here.

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