Despite the many lies and distortions in this interview, it is valuable for its discussion of the increasing militarization of political repression by an alliance of federal and state authorities, increasingly aggressive responses to nonviolent protestors, and, most interesting, the growing and highly profitable industry of crowd control. As author Stephen Graham explains to Amy Goodman:

“We have to remember, this is a really big growth industry that military and security corporations are investing heavily in terms of new research and development…. the so-called homeland security market is a real—is in real boom town—boom time, excuse me. I mean, in a world where actual defense contracts are often being reduced, a lot of the big companies are moving into civilian applications. They’re moving into these non-lethal weapons, moving into all of the technologies of crowd control and civilian disturbance control. And that has to be added to, of course, the much bigger markets that are growing in terms of broader questions of surveillance and security for buildings, for cities, for special events, as we see these systems established more and more in terms of everyday spaces and everyday bits of cities. So, I haven’t got figures at hand, I’m afraid, but it’s multibillion-dollar markets that are projected to grow globally at very, very high rates over the next 15 years, according to some of the recent market research reports.”

And so we have the perfect dialectic of capitalism and repression, repression and capitalism, whereby cops and security forces not only protect capitalism, but turn fascism and repression into a highly profitable business, which of course is partnered along with the privatized prison-for-profit industry.

Dissent, repression, police brutality, violation of civil rights — just the lastest commodities for capitalism to exploit and the transformation of protest into a lucrative industry of the security-prison industrial complex.